New NIST Raman spectrometry standard for handheld chemical detectors makes different instruments equal in output

Nov. 7, 2013
Gaithersburg, MD--When it comes to detectors for dangerous chemicals, toxins or nefarious germs, smaller and faster is better. But size and speed must still allow for accuracy, especially when measurements by different instruments must give the same result.

Gaithersburg, MD-The recent publication of a new standard for Raman spectrometersa culmination of years of research at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)provides confidence that results from handheld chemical detectors can be compared directly. These detectors are used by emergency responders to check for the presence of explosives or toxic chemicals; in addition, quality-control managers in the pharmaceutical industry use them to verify the identity of chemicals going into their production lines.

The new standard, published recently by ASTM International (Conshohocken, PA), a standards-development organization, is intended as a guide to correct the output from different handheld Raman spectrometers, so that different instruments produce the same result for the same sample. Ordinarily, Raman spectrometers from different manufacturers can produce signals with different peak intensities; these differences can be confusing, particularly if first responders from different agencies use different instruments and get differing results on an unknown sample in the field.

"Our goal is that people get the same answer for the same sample on any machine," says NIST chemist Steven Choquette.

His team developed a series of NIST standard reference materials (SRMs) that are used to correct Raman systems with differing excitation lasers. These standards enable the correction of the differences in peak intensities reported for the same sample by different Raman spectrometers. They then continued to work with spectrometer manufacturers to develop an industry consensus standard to enable comparisons among Raman spectrometers.

About the Author

John Wallace | Senior Technical Editor (1998-2022)

John Wallace was with Laser Focus World for nearly 25 years, retiring in late June 2022. He obtained a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering and physics at Rutgers University and a master's in optical engineering at the University of Rochester. Before becoming an editor, John worked as an engineer at RCA, Exxon, Eastman Kodak, and GCA Corporation.

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