Emerson QCL/TDL instrument analyzes 12 gases simultaneously

The Emerson Continuous Gas Analyzer uses a patented laser chirp method to provide high-resolution spectroscopy of gases.

Jul 28th, 2016
A combined quantum-cascade-laser and tunable-diode-laser instrument--the Rosemount CT5400 Continuous Gas Analyzer--can analyze 12 gases simultaneously for a variety of sensing and process analytics applications. (Image credit: Emerson)
A combined quantum-cascade-laser and tunable-diode-laser instrument--the Rosemount CT5400 Continuous Gas Analyzer--can analyze 12 gases simultaneously for a variety of sensing and process analytics applications. (Image credit: Emerson)

IMAGE:A combined quantum-cascade-laser and tunable-diode-laser instrument--the Rosemount CT5400 Continuous Gas Analyzer--can analyze 12 gases simultaneously for a variety of sensing and process analytics applications. (Image credit: Emerson)

Combining tunable diode laser (TDL) and quantum cascade laser (QCL) technologies within the same analyzer, the Emerson (St. Louis, MO; NYSE: EMR) Rosemount CT5400 Continuous Gas Analyzer uses a patented "laser chirp" method to provide near-instant high-resolution spectroscopy to detect and identify a range of molecules in both the near- and mid-infrared range with a dynamic range from sub-part-per-million to percent levels.

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Unlike traditional process gas analyzers requiring continuous calibration and verification, and other single laser-based systems that are limited to measurement of one or two components, Emerson says the modular and scalable design of the CT5400 can incorporate up to six high-resolution laser modules and can detect, measure, and monitor up to 12 critical gas components simultaneously, eliminating the need for multiple analyzers and sample handling systems.

The CT5400 rack-mount analyzer is designed for process applications, selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (DeNOX/SCR), ammonium nitrate precursors, continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS), and continuous ambient monitoring systems (CAMS). Sharing many of the same measurement principles as the recently released Rosemount CT5100 analyzer, which comes in a ruggedized Class 1 enclosure for hazardous area installations, the CT5400 is a cost-effective alternative for plants with an existing shelter or safe area application.

"By using the chirp methodology, the Rosemount laser-based gas analyzers have a significantly quicker response time and make continuous measurements. Sub-second measurements give operators the ability to make adjustments to their processes and avoid costly upsets that can develop into emergencies. In this way, the CT5400 offers plant managers and analyzer operators greater peace of mind," says Ruth Lindley, product manager for Emerson QCL analyzers. "The measurement is direct or 'first principle,' unlike many traditional technologies where the measurements are inferred. This improves accuracy and eliminates the need for frequent calibration, saving engineer time and substantially reducing running costs."

Emerson is comprised of five business segments: Process Management, Industrial Automation, Network Power, Climate Technologies, and Commercial & Residential Solutions. Sales in fiscal 2015 were $22.3 billion.

SOURCE: Emerson; http://www2.emersonprocess.com/en-US/news/pr/Pages/1607-ContinuousGasAnalyzer.aspx?utm_source=ROS.CT5400LaunchNR&utm_campaign=ROS.CT5400LaunchNR&utm_medium=email

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