QEOS introduces 'world's fastest LED' for short-range optical communications

April 12, 2013
Cupertino, CA--Quantum Electro Opto Systems (QEOS) has unveiled its first commercially available optical-communications products based on its high-speed "tilted charge dynamics” technology.

Cupertino, CA--Quantum Electro Opto Systems (QEOS) has unveiled its first commercially available optical-communications products based on its high-speed "tilted charge dynamics” technology. The technology forms the basis for its new high-speed LEDs, which the company says can replace other light sources such as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) for high-speed short-range fiber-optic communications. The QEOS technology is based on a so-called "optical transistor" structure.

Related: Light control in semiconductor could lead to optical transistor

Related: Two nonlinear crystals could make phase-insensitive all-optical transistor

Gabriel Walter, CEO at QEOS, calls the light source the world's fastest LED. "It’s ten times faster than the traditional LEDs in the market,” says Walter, "and the products we’re introducing are a fraction of the size, power, and cost of traditional laser-based products with the comparable functionality. With the transistor structure, various new integrated optical and electronic functions can be realized that are not possible with the existing optical technology.”

QEOS introduced its QEOS optical transceiver kit, which consists of a QEOS transmitter optical full assembly (TOFA) designed to operate with the new QEOS receiver optical full assembly (ROFA). The kit provides a low-power, low-cost 3.5 Gbit/s data transmitter for distances up to 100 m.

Also introduced was a higher speed TOFA -- an ultra-low power consumption, high-speed optical transmitter operating up to 6.5 GHz (designed for 10 Gbit/s applications), which will be available available later this year (2013).

All the TOFAs and ROFAs are “full-function” assemblies, says QEOS. The devices can be used for active optical cables, interconnecting computers, board-to-board interconnects, and in power sensitive portable applications.

“This technology can be used to support a range of transmission interfaces such as USB, HDMI, Ethernet, Thunderbolt, Infiniband, and also communications within portable devices,” said Raymond Chin, chairman of QEOS. The optical transceiver kit will soon be available for sampling.

QEOS was founded in 2008 by Gabriel Walter (CEO) and Nick Holonyak, Jr. and Milton Feng, inventors of the tilted charge light emitting transistor at the University of Illinois. For more information, including technical descriptions, see www.qeosystems.com.

About the Author

John Wallace | Senior Technical Editor (1998-2022)

John Wallace was with Laser Focus World for nearly 25 years, retiring in late June 2022. He obtained a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering and physics at Rutgers University and a master's in optical engineering at the University of Rochester. Before becoming an editor, John worked as an engineer at RCA, Exxon, Eastman Kodak, and GCA Corporation.

Voice your opinion!

To join the conversation, and become an exclusive member of Laser Focus World, create an account today!