Photonic crystals cool solar cells, increase efficiency 1%

May 9, 2016
Stanford University researchers have developed a new material that can cool a solar cell up to 13 degrees Celsius.

Stanford University (Palo Alto, CA) researchers have developed and tested a new material that can cool a solar cell by up to 13° Celsius (C) under the California winter sun. Because heat makes solar cells less efficient (typical efficiency values today are 20%), the researchers predict their cooling layer could help solar cells turn approximately 1% more sunlight into electricity, a big boost from a relatively simple add-on. The cooler temperatures also mean the solar cells will likely last longer due to greatly reduced efficiency degradation rates.

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The researchers will present their results at the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) from June 5-10 in San Jose, CA. The presentation, "Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody," by Linxiao Zhu, Aaswath P. Raman and Shanhui Fan will take place from 15:15-15:30 on Thursday June 9, 2016 in the Executive Ballroom 210B of the San Jose Convention Center.

"What's unique about our work is that we demonstrate radiative cooling [a method of making it easier for heat to escape rather than reducing heat externally or reflecting it] while preserving the amount of solar absorption," said Linxiao Zhu, a graduate student in the research group of electrical engineering professor Shanhui Fan. In other words, the new material keeps the solar cell cooler even as the solar cell absorbs the same amount of sunlight.

The researchers achieved the combination of cooling plus maintaining sunlight absorption with a wafer made of silica. The researchers etched tapered holes, about 6 microns across and 10 microns deep, in the wafer. The holes are designed to smooth the path the thermal radiation takes to escape.

The team tested the silica layer by placing it on top of a solar cell mimica polished silicon wafer with an antireflection surface and aluminum back that has similar absorption characteristics to standard solar cells, but wasn’t actually wired to produce electricity.

The testing verified that because the silica layer is transparent, approximately the same amount of sunlight still reaches the solar cell mimic. In fact, there was a slight increase in absorption because of anti-reflection and light trapping effects of the etched silica. The researchers also found that the etched silica layer lowered the temperature 13° C compared to the bare solar cell mimic.

Cold solar cells function better than hot ones, so the cooler the better, Zhu said. The researchers estimate that the 13 degrees cooling would result in an absolute efficiency improvement of more than 1%. Aaswath Raman, a co-author of the study, also noted that heat can speed up the degradation of solar cell parts, so cooling could lengthen their lifespan and likely save costs.

Ultimately, radiative cooling relies on the coldness of the universe, which is a mostly untapped thermodynamic resource, Zhu said. And solar cells aren't the only applications that could benefit from this cooling approach, especially since the new research shows it can work without significantly altering the sunlight absorption characteristics of an underlying material, Zhu said. Cooling cars, clothing, and outdoor equipment are all possible applications, he said.

The next step for Zhu and his colleagues is to test the etched silica layer with a real solar cell to demonstrate the predicted efficiency improvements. The team is also talking to industry partners who could be interested in commercializing the approach.

SOURCE: CLEO:2016 news releases; http://www.cleoconference.org/home/news-and-press/cleo-press-releases/photonic-crystals-keep-solar-cells-cool-while-stil/

About the Author

Gail Overton | Senior Editor (2004-2020)

Gail has more than 30 years of engineering, marketing, product management, and editorial experience in the photonics and optical communications industry. Before joining the staff at Laser Focus World in 2004, she held many product management and product marketing roles in the fiber-optics industry, most notably at Hughes (El Segundo, CA), GTE Labs (Waltham, MA), Corning (Corning, NY), Photon Kinetics (Beaverton, OR), and Newport Corporation (Irvine, CA). During her marketing career, Gail published articles in WDM Solutions and Sensors magazine and traveled internationally to conduct product and sales training. Gail received her BS degree in physics, with an emphasis in optics, from San Diego State University in San Diego, CA in May 1986.

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