Missouri researchers target biomedical applications with femtosecond laser

March 17, 2008
March 17, 2008, Columbia, MO--Engineers at the University of Missouri are working to demonstrate how femtosecond lasers will one day change cancer treatments, dentistry procedures, and joint implant surgeries.

March 17, 2008, Columbia, MO--Engineers at the University of Missouri are working to demonstrate how femtosecond lasers will one day change cancer treatments, dentistry procedures, and joint implant surgeries.

"The femtosecond laser has now entered the era of applications. It used to be a novelty, a fantasy," said University of Missouri researcher Robert Tzou, the James C. Dowell professor and chairman of the department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. "We are currently targeting the areas of life-science and bio-medicine."

What makes the femtosecond laser different from other lasers is its unique capacity to interact with its target without transferring heat to the area surrounding its mark. The intensity of the power gets the job done while the speed ensures heat does not spread. Results are clean cuts, strong welds and precision destruction of very small targets, such as cancer cells, with no injury to surrounding materials. Tzou hopes that the laser would essentially eliminate the need for harmful chemical therapy used in cancer treatments.

"If we have a way to use the lasers to kill cancer cells without even touching the surrounding healthy cells, that is a tremendous benefit to the patient," Tzou said. "Basically, the patient leaves the clinic immediately after treatment with no side effects or damage. The high precision and high efficiency of the UUL allows for immediate results."

Practical applications of this type of laser also include, but aren't limited to, the ability to create super-clean channels in a silicon chip. That process can allow doctors to analyze blood one cell at a time as cells flow through the channel. The laser can be used in surgery to make more precise incisions that heal faster and cause less collateral tissue damage. In dentistry, the laser can treat tooth decay without harming the rest of the tooth structure.

According to Tzou, the installation of a new laser laboratory at MU will enable research teams to "aggressively pursue success at a national level." The femtosecond laser lab, components of which were installed in January, was made possible through a gift from engineering alumnus Bill Thompson and his wife Nancy. Tzou noted that the arrival of the lab at MU has initiated additional funding requests that will utilize the new femtosecond laser in research. Zhang, Chen and engineering professor Frank Feng also were the recipients of a United States Department of Defense grant to research possible military applications of the UUL.

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