Photron donates high-speed imaging system to MIT's Edgerton Center

Dec. 23, 2009
Photron (San Diego, CA) is donating a high-speed video system to the Edgerton Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT; Cambridge, MA) for long-term use by MIT students and researchers.

Photron (San Diego, CA) is donating a high-speed video system to the Edgerton Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT; Cambridge, MA) for long-term use by MIT students and researchers. The Edgerton Center was named for MIT's Professor Harold E. ("Doc") Edgerton, known for his innovations in high-speed imaging and support for hands-on learning. The Center is committed to carrying on his legacy of involving MIT students in challenging activities and projects, particularly high speed imaging in engineering and science.

Photron is donating a Fastcam SA5 high-speed imager. "The system's advanced slow-motion capabilities will enable new research and enhance our educational offerings," says J. Kim Vandiver, director of the Edgerton Center. "We are grateful to our colleagues at Photron and delighted to be the recipient of this long-term gift. We look forward to working with MIT's researchers and students on their high-speed imaging projects."

The Fastcam SA5 camera provides up to 7,500 frames per second (fps) at megapixel resolution (1,024 x 1,000); it is capable of delivering more than 1 million fps at reduced resolution. The standalone, one-piece imaging system has a 12-bit monochrome, 36-bit RGB color sensor that has 20-micron-square pixels.

For more information about Photron's high speed imaging systems and motion analysis software, visit: www.photron.com.

For more information about MIT's Edgerton Center, visit: http://web.mit.edu/Edgerton/.

About the Author

John Wallace | Senior Technical Editor (1998-2022)

John Wallace was with Laser Focus World for nearly 25 years, retiring in late June 2022. He obtained a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering and physics at Rutgers University and a master's in optical engineering at the University of Rochester. Before becoming an editor, John worked as an engineer at RCA, Exxon, Eastman Kodak, and GCA Corporation.

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