A message from the staff...

Oct. 1, 2001
As this is written, it is only a few days after the tragic events of Tuesday, September 11, 2001. Together with the rest of our colleagues in the optoelectronics community, the staff of Laser Focus World is saddened and stunned by what took place.

As this is written, it is only a few days after the tragic events of Tuesday, September 11, 2001. Together with the rest of our colleagues in the optoelectronics community, the staff of Laser Focus World is saddened and stunned by what took place. Our thoughts and prayers go out not only to the victims' families and friends, but also to the heroic rescue crews, and to everyone else affected by these unconscionable acts of evil.

Small bull shows big potential
Early on in the life of the laser, scientists recognized the unique ability of laser light to modify materials in many different ways, and much research has subsequently been directed toward taking commercial advantage of these effects. Their significance is evidenced by the size of the materials processing market, which currently ranks as the largest for nondiode lasers, accounting for more than 60% of total global sales (see Laser Focus World, January 2001, p. 88).

The model bull on this month's cover represents one of the most recent and intriguing manifestations of current materials processing research. The result of two-photon photopolymerization, the bull is actually about the size of a red blood cell and is a novel way of highlighting a technique with potential applications ranging from medicine to computing (see p. 17). Meanwhile, this month's "Back-to-Basics" feature takes a look at the evolution of the high-power carbon dioxide laser, which has been one of the mainstays of industrial materials processing for the past 40 years (see p. 89).

Elsewhere in this issue, other features include a look at developments in high-speed imaging (see p. 79), a discussion of intensified CCDs (see p. 97), and the outlook for passive optical networks (see p. 69). The Optoelectronics World supplement, which follows p. 114, carries three articles about the design, fabrication, and use of mirrors in optical systems.

About the Author

Stephen G. Anderson | Director, Industry Development - SPIE

 Stephen Anderson is a photonics industry expert with an international background and has been actively involved with lasers and photonics for more than 30 years. As Director, Industry Development at SPIE – The international society for optics and photonics – he is responsible for tracking the photonics industry markets and technology to help define long-term strategy, while also facilitating development of SPIE’s industry activities. Before joining SPIE, Anderson was Associate Publisher and Editor in Chief of Laser Focus World and chaired the Lasers & Photonics Marketplace Seminar. Anderson also co-founded the BioOptics World brand. Anderson holds a chemistry degree from the University of York and an Executive MBA from Golden Gate University.    

Sponsored Recommendations

Request a free Micro 3D Printed sample part

April 11, 2024
The best way to understand the part quality we can achieve is by seeing it first-hand. Request a free 3D printed high-precision sample part.

How to Tune Servo Systems: The Basics

April 10, 2024
Learn how to tune a servo system using frequency-based tools to meet system specifications by watching our webinar!

Motion Scan and Data Collection Methods for Electro-Optic System Testing

April 10, 2024
Learn how different scanning patterns and approaches can be used in measuring an electro-optic sensor performance, by reading our whitepaper here!

How Precision Motion Systems are Shaping the Future of Semiconductor Manufacturing

March 28, 2024
This article highlights the pivotal role precision motion systems play in supporting the latest semiconductor manufacturing trends.

Voice your opinion!

To join the conversation, and become an exclusive member of Laser Focus World, create an account today!