It’s a small world . . .

June 1, 2005
The global nature of photonics and optoelectronics has, I suppose, become something of a cliché-we’ve certainly mentioned it here often enough and have recently launched new local versions of Laser Focus World in both ­Japan and China.

The global nature of photonics and optoelectronics has, I suppose, become something of a cliché-we’ve certainly mentioned it here often enough and have recently launched new local versions of Laser Focus World in both ­Japan and China. But clichés generally become so for good reason, and while ­reviewing the material for this issue I was struck by the unusually high profile of geography. Our “Asia Report” cover story about the “greening” of photonics highlights important new environmental rules and regulations in Asia and Europe and discusses their probable ­impact on optoelectronics manufacturing everywhere (see p. 110). Meanwhile, separate conference reviews from Austria and Ireland both underscore the thriving ­photonics activities in many different parts of the world (see p. 47 and p. 22, respectively)-as does the rest of the “Optoelectronics World News” that begins on page 15. And then of course, this issue will be “hot off the press” at Laser 2005 in Munich, Germany, where photonics advances and applications will be on show from all over the globe.

. . . and getting smaller

Among the many advancements presented in Munich and at other ­science conferences worldwide, nanoscale technology is increasingly ­prominent. Our recent news coverage, for example, has chronicled ­numerous developments within nanoscale photonics (see p. 49)-a trend that’s ­likely to ­accelerate, given the broad applicability of nanoscale science and tech­nology. In the photonics arena, the performance of quantum dot is improving (see p. 157), while nano biomarkers and optical sensors will likely open up entirely new ­avenues of research into diseases such as ­ cancer and ­Alzheimer’s disease (see p. 105). And as the world shrinks, so to speak, ­innovative tools will be required to see and feel it: new microscopes (see www.laserfocusworld.com/articles/225987) and accessories like nanopositioning systems are just two examples (see p. 81).

About the Author

Stephen G. Anderson | Director, Industry Development - SPIE

 Stephen Anderson is a photonics industry expert with an international background and has been actively involved with lasers and photonics for more than 30 years. As Director, Industry Development at SPIE – The international society for optics and photonics – he is responsible for tracking the photonics industry markets and technology to help define long-term strategy, while also facilitating development of SPIE’s industry activities. Before joining SPIE, Anderson was Associate Publisher and Editor in Chief of Laser Focus World and chaired the Lasers & Photonics Marketplace Seminar. Anderson also co-founded the BioOptics World brand. Anderson holds a chemistry degree from the University of York and an Executive MBA from Golden Gate University.    

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