It’s a small world . . .

The global nature of photonics and optoelectronics has, I suppose, become something of a cliché-we’ve certainly mentioned it here often enough and have recently launched new local versions of Laser Focus World in both ­Japan and China.

Jun 1st, 2005

The global nature of photonics and optoelectronics has, I suppose, become something of a cliché-we’ve certainly mentioned it here often enough and have recently launched new local versions of Laser Focus World in both ­Japan and China. But clichés generally become so for good reason, and while ­reviewing the material for this issue I was struck by the unusually high profile of geography. Our “Asia Report” cover story about the “greening” of photonics highlights important new environmental rules and regulations in Asia and Europe and discusses their probable ­impact on optoelectronics manufacturing everywhere (see p. 110). Meanwhile, separate conference reviews from Austria and Ireland both underscore the thriving ­photonics activities in many different parts of the world (see p. 47 and p. 22, respectively)-as does the rest of the “Optoelectronics World News” that begins on page 15. And then of course, this issue will be “hot off the press” at Laser 2005 in Munich, Germany, where photonics advances and applications will be on show from all over the globe.

. . . and getting smaller

Among the many advancements presented in Munich and at other ­science conferences worldwide, nanoscale technology is increasingly ­prominent. Our recent news coverage, for example, has chronicled ­numerous developments within nanoscale photonics (see p. 49)-a trend that’s ­likely to ­accelerate, given the broad applicability of nanoscale science and tech­nology. In the photonics arena, the performance of quantum dot is improving (see p. 157), while nano biomarkers and optical sensors will likely open up entirely new ­avenues of research into diseases such as ­ cancer and ­Alzheimer’s disease (see p. 105). And as the world shrinks, so to speak, ­innovative tools will be required to see and feel it: new microscopes (see www.laserfocusworld.com/articles/225987) and accessories like nanopositioning systems are just two examples (see p. 81).

Stephen G. Anderson
Associate Publisher/Editor in Chief
stevega@pennwell.com

More in Research