EU directive challenges manufacturers

Ending a four-year transition period, the European Union`s Electro-Magnetic Compatibility (EMC) directive goes into force on January 1, 1996, after which all electrical and electronic equipment--including lasers and electro-optic equipment--sold or installed in European Union (EU) countries must comply with the permissible levels for both emissions from equipment and susceptibility of equipment to incoming electromagnetic signals, as defined in the EMC directive. The directive was originally int

EU directive challenges manufacturers

Ending a four-year transition period, the European Union`s Electro-Magnetic Compatibility (EMC) directive goes into force on January 1, 1996, after which all electrical and electronic equipment--including lasers and electro-optic equipment--sold or installed in European Union (EU) countries must comply with the permissible levels for both emissions from equipment and susceptibility of equipment to incoming electromagnetic signals, as defined in the EMC directive. The directive was originally intended to take effect in January 1992. Significant technical problems in reaching compliance were, however, encountered by manufacturers of all types of equipment. As a result, in April 1992, the Council of the EU passed an amending directive to allow a four-year period for manufacturers to bring products u¥to the standard (see Laser Focus World, Feb. 1995, p. 52).

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