Vertical-field-emission device features thin-film edge

Scientists at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL, Washington, DC) have demonstrated proof-of-principle for an ungated vertical thin-film-edge field-emitter-display (FED) cathode. The technology offers lower fabrication costs than current active-matrix liquid-crystal displays as well as lower power consumption, a wide temperature operating range, and high resolution without viewing-angle-dependent intensity and color changes.

Vertical-field-emission device features thin-film edge

Scientists at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL, Washington, DC) have demonstrated proof-of-principle for an ungated vertical thin-film-edge field-emitter-display (FED) cathode. The technology offers lower fabrication costs than current active-matrix liquid-crystal displays as well as lower power consumption, a wide temperature operating range, and high resolution without viewing-angle-dependent intensity and color changes.

Current FED prototypes, however, use a conical field emitter that requires expensive lithography and other difficult fabrication processes and is a pencil-point design with a small emitting area. The NRL-developed field emitter features razor-blade-like edges of a vertically oriented thin film made by chemical-beam deposition. The result is a larger emitting area and better back-ion bombardment protection with excellent scaling over large areas. Fabrication cost savings are estimated to be at least 50% over current FED production methods.

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