Erbium:YAG laser aids transdermal drug delivery

Researchers from Venisect (Little Rock, AR) have shown that using an Er:YAG laser (with output at 2.94 µm) to alter the outermost layer of human skin significantly improves the ability to transdermally deliver a wide range of drugs, including insulin, interferon, hydrocortisone, and a lidocaine solution, without the need for needles and syringes. Historically, only a limited number of drugs have been delivered transdermally because the majority are unable to pass through the skin`s surface.

Apr 1st, 1996

Erbium:YAG laser aids transdermal drug delivery

Researchers from Venisect (Little Rock, AR) have shown that using an Er:YAG laser (with output at 2.94 µm) to alter the outermost layer of human skin significantly improves the ability to transdermally deliver a wide range of drugs, including insulin, interferon, hydrocortisone, and a lidocaine solution, without the need for needles and syringes. Historically, only a limited number of drugs have been delivered transdermally because the majority are unable to pass through the skin`s surface. Venisect and LaBarge (St. Louis, MO) have been jointly developing an erbium-laser blood-drawing device since 1993; this laser was modified for use in the transdermal applications. Clinical trials are now under way.

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