Eyeteq algorithm helps the colorblind see colors

Using the Eyeteq image-processing algorithm, color vision deficiency sufferers can see colors better in still and video images.

Content Dam Lfw Print Articles 2017 01 1701lfw Nb 4

Color-blind individuals can be restricted from certain tasks and job types—especially when red and green colors are involved that translate into "stop" and "go" functions. This color vision deficiency (CVD) occurs when red or green cones are missing from the normal red, green, and blue (RGB) cones found in the retina. Using the Eyeteq image-processing algorithm, researchers at Spectral Edge (Cambridge, England) can allow CVD sufferers to see colors better in still and video images.

Content Dam Lfw Print Articles 2017 01 1701lfw Nb 4

The Eyeteq algorithm works by using image-fusion principles that are designed to take images captured in a light that is invisible to the naked eye (infrared) and "project" them into regular color images. Similarly, it considers the light spectrum that CVD sufferers struggle to discriminate and projects it in a part of the spectrum they can see. More precisely, Eyeteq decomposes image features into color and contrast (by "contrast" meaning "color difference"; that is, between black and white there is high contrast, between red and orange not as much). It then takes the contrast component and projects it to the color range in which CVD sufferers achieve normal discrimination, while preserving the overall original color information. This way, CVD sufferers can distinguish between colors they normally confuse, and at the same time viewers with normal color vision can still enjoy natural colors. Reference: Spectral Edge, Eyeteq white paper v1.0, "Enhancing TV and video for color blind viewers" (2016); http://spectraledge.co.uk/publications.

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