Schott's "Image Assembler" views simultaneous images from multiple perspectives

Sept. 10, 2009
A digital camera can now image multiple fields of view at the same time with the new "Image Assembler" technology that Schott unveiled at the Defence Systems & Equipment International 2009 Exhibition (September 8 to 11; London, England).

A digital camera can now image multiple fields of view at the same time with the new "Image Assembler" technology that Schott (Mainz, Germany) unveiled at the Defence Systems & Equipment International 2009 Exhibition (September 8 to 11; London, England).

The fiber-optic-based lenses in the Image Assembler are equipped with either rigid or flexible image guides that allow individual images to be assembled to create a panoramic field of view. This technology is particularly well-suited for remote-surveillance applications, although Schott offers lenses designed for use in a variety of imaging platforms.

"With the versatile Image Assembler, large areas or specific fields of view can be imaged with just a single camera," says Thea Marcoux, a marketing specialist for lighting and imaging at Schott North America (Elmsford, NY). "Multiple cameras or specialized equipment are currently required to achieve this capability, which increases the cost and complexity of an imaging system. This complicated construction is now a thing of the past, thanks to Schott's Image Assembler technology."

The Image Assembler can be coupled directly with a CCD/CMOS sensor or used with relay lenses to facilitate quick disconnection and interchangeability. The field of view that is captured by the sensor depends on the design and orientation of the lenses. Schott selects lenses, housings, and camera units that meet customer-specific requirements.

Defense uses
In the defense sector, the Image Assembler is particularly well-suited to wide-area surveillance applications. The simple design and low power consumption allow this technology to be used in a variety of platforms, such as remote unmanned aerial, underwater, and ground vehicles. This technology can also be used in a hemispherical array for capturing muzzle-flash and rocket-plume light signatures.

The Image Assembler comes in either a rigid or flexible format and is manufactured to meet specific customer requirements.

About the Author

John Wallace | Senior Technical Editor (1998-2022)

John Wallace was with Laser Focus World for nearly 25 years, retiring in late June 2022. He obtained a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering and physics at Rutgers University and a master's in optical engineering at the University of Rochester. Before becoming an editor, John worked as an engineer at RCA, Exxon, Eastman Kodak, and GCA Corporation.

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