Compact fiber laser provides highly stable femtosecond pulses

Scientists at IMRA America (Ann Arbor, MI) developed a compact femtosecond erbium-doped fiber oscillator that is environmentally stable and can operate without realignment under all laboratory conditions. IMRA spokesman Mike Dearing said the device is "an ultrafast laser in a box no one needs to touch." The laser produces 200-fs, 1.56-µm pulses at the center of the erbium gain curve, making it possible to amplify the output to energies useful for such processes as nonlinear conversion. Chirp

May 1st, 1995

Scientists at IMRA America (Ann Arbor, MI) developed a compact femtosecond erbium-doped fiber oscillator that is environmentally stable and can operate without realignment under all laboratory conditions. IMRA spokesman Mike Dearing said the device is "an ultrafast laser in a box no one needs to touch." The laser produces 200-fs, 1.56-µm pulses at the center of the erbium gain curve, making it possible to amplify the output to energies useful for such processes as nonlinear conversion. Chirped pulse amplification with in-fiber Bragg gratings produced 400-fs, 10-nJ pulses with 50-mW average power. By using external metal gratings, the researchers obtained 450-fs, 2.5-µJ pulses.

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