G. J. Dixon

Contributing Editor

G. J. Dixon was a Contributing Editor for Laser Focus World.

Researchers at the Florida Solar Energy Center (Cocoa, FL) use infrared imaging systems to improve the energy efficiency of air-conditioned homes. The pictures show the return air vent of a central AC unit. On the left, there is a leak in the return air duct that allows the system to suck hot air from the attic into the vent. This problem has been corrected in the image on the right. In both images the temperature range shown is from 66°F (dark colors) to 84°F (white).
Researchers at the Florida Solar Energy Center (Cocoa, FL) use infrared imaging systems to improve the energy efficiency of air-conditioned homes. The pictures show the return air vent of a central AC unit. On the left, there is a leak in the return air duct that allows the system to suck hot air from the attic into the vent. This problem has been corrected in the image on the right. In both images the temperature range shown is from 66°F (dark colors) to 84°F (white).
Researchers at the Florida Solar Energy Center (Cocoa, FL) use infrared imaging systems to improve the energy efficiency of air-conditioned homes. The pictures show the return air vent of a central AC unit. On the left, there is a leak in the return air duct that allows the system to suck hot air from the attic into the vent. This problem has been corrected in the image on the right. In both images the temperature range shown is from 66°F (dark colors) to 84°F (white).
Researchers at the Florida Solar Energy Center (Cocoa, FL) use infrared imaging systems to improve the energy efficiency of air-conditioned homes. The pictures show the return air vent of a central AC unit. On the left, there is a leak in the return air duct that allows the system to suck hot air from the attic into the vent. This problem has been corrected in the image on the right. In both images the temperature range shown is from 66°F (dark colors) to 84°F (white).
Researchers at the Florida Solar Energy Center (Cocoa, FL) use infrared imaging systems to improve the energy efficiency of air-conditioned homes. The pictures show the return air vent of a central AC unit. On the left, there is a leak in the return air duct that allows the system to suck hot air from the attic into the vent. This problem has been corrected in the image on the right. In both images the temperature range shown is from 66°F (dark colors) to 84°F (white).
Detectors & Imaging

INFRARED IMAGING: Infrared arrays see temperature gradients

Nov. 1, 1999
Arrays of infrared detectors are routinely used for the visualization of thermal gradients and IR-emitting objects.
The combination of sequential fluorescent microscopy images, recorded with different filters placed in front of a CCD array, can generate high-resolution color images. These three images were recorded using filters that were matched to the emission bands of BODIPY, Texas Red, and DAPI. Different colors, each corresponding to a different dye, show the distribution of tubulin, F-actin, and nuclei in bovine pulmonary-artery endothelial cells.
The combination of sequential fluorescent microscopy images, recorded with different filters placed in front of a CCD array, can generate high-resolution color images. These three images were recorded using filters that were matched to the emission bands of BODIPY, Texas Red, and DAPI. Different colors, each corresponding to a different dye, show the distribution of tubulin, F-actin, and nuclei in bovine pulmonary-artery endothelial cells.
The combination of sequential fluorescent microscopy images, recorded with different filters placed in front of a CCD array, can generate high-resolution color images. These three images were recorded using filters that were matched to the emission bands of BODIPY, Texas Red, and DAPI. Different colors, each corresponding to a different dye, show the distribution of tubulin, F-actin, and nuclei in bovine pulmonary-artery endothelial cells.
The combination of sequential fluorescent microscopy images, recorded with different filters placed in front of a CCD array, can generate high-resolution color images. These three images were recorded using filters that were matched to the emission bands of BODIPY, Texas Red, and DAPI. Different colors, each corresponding to a different dye, show the distribution of tubulin, F-actin, and nuclei in bovine pulmonary-artery endothelial cells.
The combination of sequential fluorescent microscopy images, recorded with different filters placed in front of a CCD array, can generate high-resolution color images. These three images were recorded using filters that were matched to the emission bands of BODIPY, Texas Red, and DAPI. Different colors, each corresponding to a different dye, show the distribution of tubulin, F-actin, and nuclei in bovine pulmonary-artery endothelial cells.
Detectors & Imaging

Visible imaging focuses on consumer markets

Jan. 1, 1999
Improved CCD-array technology is at the heart of the current generation of video and digital still cameras.
Optical-scattering techniques can map the angular dependence of subsurface damage in a silicon wafer. In this plot, scattering intensity at 21 locations, equally space along a 5-mm path, is shown as a function of incident angle. In the plot, radial distance is proportional to path length, while the angular coordinate corresponds to the angle of the incident beam relative to a coordinate system fixed to the sample surface. High scattering intensity is observed for incident angles along the vertical axis of the graph.
Optical-scattering techniques can map the angular dependence of subsurface damage in a silicon wafer. In this plot, scattering intensity at 21 locations, equally space along a 5-mm path, is shown as a function of incident angle. In the plot, radial distance is proportional to path length, while the angular coordinate corresponds to the angle of the incident beam relative to a coordinate system fixed to the sample surface. High scattering intensity is observed for incident angles along the vertical axis of the graph.
Optical-scattering techniques can map the angular dependence of subsurface damage in a silicon wafer. In this plot, scattering intensity at 21 locations, equally space along a 5-mm path, is shown as a function of incident angle. In the plot, radial distance is proportional to path length, while the angular coordinate corresponds to the angle of the incident beam relative to a coordinate system fixed to the sample surface. High scattering intensity is observed for incident angles along the vertical axis of the graph.
Optical-scattering techniques can map the angular dependence of subsurface damage in a silicon wafer. In this plot, scattering intensity at 21 locations, equally space along a 5-mm path, is shown as a function of incident angle. In the plot, radial distance is proportional to path length, while the angular coordinate corresponds to the angle of the incident beam relative to a coordinate system fixed to the sample surface. High scattering intensity is observed for incident angles along the vertical axis of the graph.
Optical-scattering techniques can map the angular dependence of subsurface damage in a silicon wafer. In this plot, scattering intensity at 21 locations, equally space along a 5-mm path, is shown as a function of incident angle. In the plot, radial distance is proportional to path length, while the angular coordinate corresponds to the angle of the incident beam relative to a coordinate system fixed to the sample surface. High scattering intensity is observed for incident angles along the vertical axis of the graph.
Optics

Light scattering maps surface imperfections

Nov. 1, 1998
Instruments that measure the properties of light scattered when a laser beam interacts with a test object can provide detailed information on surface roughness and bulk imperfections...