Matthias Schulze

Director of Marketing, OEM Components and Instrumentation at Coherent

Matthias Schulze is Director of Marketing, OEM Components and Instrumentation at Coherent (Santa Clara, CA).

FIGURE 1. In a flow cytometer, fluorescently labeled cells pass single-file in a flow stream and are illuminated by several different laser wavelengths. The resulting fluorescence is detected after separation into different wavelength bands.
FIGURE 1. In a flow cytometer, fluorescently labeled cells pass single-file in a flow stream and are illuminated by several different laser wavelengths. The resulting fluorescence is detected after separation into different wavelength bands.
FIGURE 1. In a flow cytometer, fluorescently labeled cells pass single-file in a flow stream and are illuminated by several different laser wavelengths. The resulting fluorescence is detected after separation into different wavelength bands.
FIGURE 1. In a flow cytometer, fluorescently labeled cells pass single-file in a flow stream and are illuminated by several different laser wavelengths. The resulting fluorescence is detected after separation into different wavelength bands.
FIGURE 1. In a flow cytometer, fluorescently labeled cells pass single-file in a flow stream and are illuminated by several different laser wavelengths. The resulting fluorescence is detected after separation into different wavelength bands.
Lasers & Sources

Laser engines improve life sciences applications

Aug. 18, 2022
Multiwavelength laser engines, which combine laser sources with pre-aligned and stabilized free-space focusing optics or integrated fiber delivery systems, simplify alignment ...
FIGURE 1. In flow cytometry, cells move in single file in a narrow flow stream, where they are excited by one or more laser beams.
FIGURE 1. In flow cytometry, cells move in single file in a narrow flow stream, where they are excited by one or more laser beams.
FIGURE 1. In flow cytometry, cells move in single file in a narrow flow stream, where they are excited by one or more laser beams.
FIGURE 1. In flow cytometry, cells move in single file in a narrow flow stream, where they are excited by one or more laser beams.
FIGURE 1. In flow cytometry, cells move in single file in a narrow flow stream, where they are excited by one or more laser beams.
Lasers & Sources

Trends in flow cytometry lasers call for more new wavelengths

Sept. 22, 2021
As the need for more personalized medicine increases, researchers are finding that new laser wavelengths and integrated multiwavelength laser light engines are enabling high-dimensional...
FIGURE 1. These total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were obtained using two excitation lasers combined in the Coherent Galaxy laser combiner; as part of research on the binding of actin filaments, the red signal is from Cy5-labeled Tm1A (protein) fluorescence excited at 640 nm, and the green signal is due to Alexa488 labeled actin excited at 488 nm. [1]
FIGURE 1. These total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were obtained using two excitation lasers combined in the Coherent Galaxy laser combiner; as part of research on the binding of actin filaments, the red signal is from Cy5-labeled Tm1A (protein) fluorescence excited at 640 nm, and the green signal is due to Alexa488 labeled actin excited at 488 nm. [1]
FIGURE 1. These total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were obtained using two excitation lasers combined in the Coherent Galaxy laser combiner; as part of research on the binding of actin filaments, the red signal is from Cy5-labeled Tm1A (protein) fluorescence excited at 640 nm, and the green signal is due to Alexa488 labeled actin excited at 488 nm. [1]
FIGURE 1. These total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were obtained using two excitation lasers combined in the Coherent Galaxy laser combiner; as part of research on the binding of actin filaments, the red signal is from Cy5-labeled Tm1A (protein) fluorescence excited at 640 nm, and the green signal is due to Alexa488 labeled actin excited at 488 nm. [1]
FIGURE 1. These total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were obtained using two excitation lasers combined in the Coherent Galaxy laser combiner; as part of research on the binding of actin filaments, the red signal is from Cy5-labeled Tm1A (protein) fluorescence excited at 640 nm, and the green signal is due to Alexa488 labeled actin excited at 488 nm. [1]
Lasers & Sources

How to Choose a Laser: How to choose a laser for microscopy

June 1, 2018
While laser wavelength and power are obvious critical parameters, there are numerous other factors to consider when specifying an optical microscope illumination system.