Dan Callen

Product Line Manager, Direct-diode Laser Systems at Coherent

Dan Callen is Product Line Manager for Direct-diode Laser Systems at Coherent (Santa Clara, CA).

FIGURE 1. In flow cytometry, cells move in single file in a narrow flow stream, where they are excited by one or more laser beams.
FIGURE 1. In flow cytometry, cells move in single file in a narrow flow stream, where they are excited by one or more laser beams.
FIGURE 1. In flow cytometry, cells move in single file in a narrow flow stream, where they are excited by one or more laser beams.
FIGURE 1. In flow cytometry, cells move in single file in a narrow flow stream, where they are excited by one or more laser beams.
FIGURE 1. In flow cytometry, cells move in single file in a narrow flow stream, where they are excited by one or more laser beams.
Lasers & Sources

Trends in flow cytometry lasers call for more new wavelengths

Sept. 22, 2021
As the need for more personalized medicine increases, researchers are finding that new laser wavelengths and integrated multiwavelength laser light engines are enabling high-dimensional...
FIGURE 1. In SCAPE, a light sheet is formed at an oblique angle by off-axis illumination of the primary microscope objective with a line profile beam (a); SCAPE builds a volumetric image by scanning the light sheet while capturing a series of images of the illuminated plane (b).
FIGURE 1. In SCAPE, a light sheet is formed at an oblique angle by off-axis illumination of the primary microscope objective with a line profile beam (a); SCAPE builds a volumetric image by scanning the light sheet while capturing a series of images of the illuminated plane (b).
FIGURE 1. In SCAPE, a light sheet is formed at an oblique angle by off-axis illumination of the primary microscope objective with a line profile beam (a); SCAPE builds a volumetric image by scanning the light sheet while capturing a series of images of the illuminated plane (b).
FIGURE 1. In SCAPE, a light sheet is formed at an oblique angle by off-axis illumination of the primary microscope objective with a line profile beam (a); SCAPE builds a volumetric image by scanning the light sheet while capturing a series of images of the illuminated plane (b).
FIGURE 1. In SCAPE, a light sheet is formed at an oblique angle by off-axis illumination of the primary microscope objective with a line profile beam (a); SCAPE builds a volumetric image by scanning the light sheet while capturing a series of images of the illuminated plane (b).
Detectors & Imaging

High-resolution, multicolor 3D imaging at the speed of life

Oct. 13, 2020
An innovative laser fluorescence technique, swept confocally aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) microscopy, overcomes the limitations of earlier methods and offers broad life sciences...
FIGURE 1. These total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were obtained using two excitation lasers combined in the Coherent Galaxy laser combiner; as part of research on the binding of actin filaments, the red signal is from Cy5-labeled Tm1A (protein) fluorescence excited at 640 nm, and the green signal is due to Alexa488 labeled actin excited at 488 nm. [1]
FIGURE 1. These total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were obtained using two excitation lasers combined in the Coherent Galaxy laser combiner; as part of research on the binding of actin filaments, the red signal is from Cy5-labeled Tm1A (protein) fluorescence excited at 640 nm, and the green signal is due to Alexa488 labeled actin excited at 488 nm. [1]
FIGURE 1. These total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were obtained using two excitation lasers combined in the Coherent Galaxy laser combiner; as part of research on the binding of actin filaments, the red signal is from Cy5-labeled Tm1A (protein) fluorescence excited at 640 nm, and the green signal is due to Alexa488 labeled actin excited at 488 nm. [1]
FIGURE 1. These total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were obtained using two excitation lasers combined in the Coherent Galaxy laser combiner; as part of research on the binding of actin filaments, the red signal is from Cy5-labeled Tm1A (protein) fluorescence excited at 640 nm, and the green signal is due to Alexa488 labeled actin excited at 488 nm. [1]
FIGURE 1. These total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were obtained using two excitation lasers combined in the Coherent Galaxy laser combiner; as part of research on the binding of actin filaments, the red signal is from Cy5-labeled Tm1A (protein) fluorescence excited at 640 nm, and the green signal is due to Alexa488 labeled actin excited at 488 nm. [1]
Lasers & Sources

How to Choose a Laser: How to choose a laser for microscopy

June 1, 2018
While laser wavelength and power are obvious critical parameters, there are numerous other factors to consider when specifying an optical microscope illumination system.