Agreement will boost green laser volumes

HALLSTEAD, PA—Up to now, the missing energy-efficient color source in next-generation RGB laser projectors has been the green laser (see www.laserfocusworld.com/articles/328527 & 325459).

HALLSTEAD, PA—Up to now, the missing energy-efficient color source in next-generation RGB laser projectors has been the green laser (see www.laserfocusworld.com/articles/328527 & 325459). While a host of companies are pursuing the development of green lasers, Snake Creek Lasers has just signed a licensing, manufacturing, and collaboration agreement with Alps Electric (Tokyo, Japan) that will enable it to pursue high-volume manufacturing of Snake Creek’s own green micro lasers.

Alps Electric is a global developer and manufacturer of electronic devices and components, supplying over 40,000 different components to about 2,000 companies all over the world. “Alps Electric scoured the globe for energy-efficient lasers and determined that Snake Creek has the sought-after technology to satisfy the requirements of portable RGB displays,” said Toshihiro Kuriyama, general manager of business development at Alps Electric.

Snake Creek Lasers provides diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) lasers and laser modules to a large number of industrial and government organizations for biomedical, laser projector, and aiming applications. The company also conducts contract solid-state laser research and development in the areas of high-power cryogenic solid-state lasers, alexandrite lasers, near- and mid-infrared lasers, eye-safe lasers, ultrafast lasers, and in laser and optical materials. “Snake Creek’s miniature DPSS lasers are already designed into many prototype and pre-production RGB displays destined for inclusion in next-generation cell phones and laptops,” commented David Brown, Snake Creek’s manager.

From a June 11th article by Staci Wilson in the Susquehanna Independent Weekender, Snake Creek Lasers still cannot compete cost-wise with red and blue lasers manufactured by other companies; however, the green laser technology developed by Snake Creek is relatively low in cost compared to alternative green sources. Snake Creek’s laser is also the smallest green laser in the world. “That’s why people are so interested. They’re the smallest in the world and put out more power. That’s why Alps came to us,” said Lisa Vitali, director of business development of Snake Creek Lasers.

Snake Creek is small compared to electronic companies of Asia and Europe. For Snake Creek to manufacture green lasers for consumer products would be a stretch, said Sten Tornegard, marketing manager, Snake Creek Lasers. “That is why we have entered into the agreement with Alps Electric who has the capability to manufacture the product in a way to satisfy the consumer market,” said Tornegard. “Snake Creek Lasers brings the technology to the table. Alps Electric brings the production capability.”

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