Joint effort targets 1064 nm single-photon counter

CRANBURY, NJ AND GENEVA, SWITZERLAND—Princeton Lightwave and id Quantique have announce plans to develop the world’s first single-photon counting module optimized for 1064 nm by combining an optimized avalanche photodiode with integrated biasing and quenching electronics.

Nov 15th, 2007

CRANBURY, NJ AND GENEVA, SWITZERLAND—Princeton Lightwave and id Quantique have announce plans to develop the world’s first single-photon counting module optimized for 1064 nm by combining an optimized avalanche photodiode with integrated biasing and quenching electronics.

Single photons are difficult to detect at a wavelength close to 1064 nm with high efficiency, low noise, and low jitter. This region of the spectrum lies at the edge of the sensitivity of both silicon and indium-gallium-arsenide (InGaAs) avalanche photodiodes. Currently, the best approach is to use a silicon avalanche-photodiodebased single-photon detector. Unfortunately, the efficiency does not exceed a few percent. Recognizing the importance of this part of the spectrum, Princeton Lightwave and id Quantique have decided to initiate a collaboration to close this detection hole by providing optimized detectors.

Princeton Lightwave will use its expertise in III-V single-photon detector design and fabrication to develop an InGaAs phosphide/indium phosphide avalanche photodiode optimized for Geiger-mode operation with high efficiency at 1064 nm. id Quantique will combine this photodiode with its integrated active quenching circuit, which guarantees high performance, thanks to fast quenching, low capacitance, and high reliability.

This detector module will target applications in the growing fields of free-space quantum-key distribution, remote sensing, and spectroscopy. It will be launched at the end of 2007 and will be demonstrated at the Photonics West show in San Jose, CA, January 20–24, 2008.

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