Random-lasing-based Raman fiber amplification is temperature-insensitive

April 3, 2013
A team of researchers has experimentally compared two forms of distributed Raman amplification (DRA) for fibers: one relying on random fiber lasers (RFLs) either forward- or backward-pumped, and the other based on the more-conventional bidirectional first- or second-order pumping.

Researchers at the University of Electronic Science & Technology of China and Sichuan Normal University (both in Chengdu, China) have experimentally compared two forms of distributed Raman amplification (DRA) for fibers: one relying on random fiber lasers (RFLs) either forward- or backward-pumped, and the other based on the more-conventional bidirectional first- or second-order pumping. All experiments were carried out on 93 km of standard singlemode fiber, with the effective noise figure (ENF) being the parameter of interest.

Bidirectional first-order pumping was done with a 1480 nm pump, while second-order pumping used a 1366 nm pump and two 1454 nm fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) added to the fiber. The forward (or backward) random laser pumping was similar to the bidirectional second-order pumping, but with the removal of one FBG (or, for backward, the other FBG) to avoid facet feedback while lowering the lasing threshold. Random lasing occurs entirely through random Rayleigh distributed feedback and Raman amplification (no end mirrors are involved). Forward random pumping produced an ENF lower than that of the bidirectional first-order pumping and second-order pumping by 2.3 and 1.3 dB, respectively. Compared to bidirectional pumping, forward and backward random pumping had higher and lower gain, respectively. And, unlike bidirectional pumping, the random-lasing-based amplification was insensitive to variations in ambient temperature between -40 and +40°C. Contact Yun-Jiang Rao at [email protected].

About the Author

John Wallace | Senior Technical Editor (1998-2022)

John Wallace was with Laser Focus World for nearly 25 years, retiring in late June 2022. He obtained a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering and physics at Rutgers University and a master's in optical engineering at the University of Rochester. Before becoming an editor, John worked as an engineer at RCA, Exxon, Eastman Kodak, and GCA Corporation.

Sponsored Recommendations

Request a quote: Micro 3D Printed Part or microArch micro-precision 3D printers

April 11, 2024
See the results for yourself! We'll print a benchmark part so that you can assess our quality. Just send us your file and we'll get to work.

Request a free Micro 3D Printed sample part

April 11, 2024
The best way to understand the part quality we can achieve is by seeing it first-hand. Request a free 3D printed high-precision sample part.

How to Tune Servo Systems: The Basics

April 10, 2024
Learn how to tune a servo system using frequency-based tools to meet system specifications by watching our webinar!

Precision Motion Control for Sample Manipulation in Ultra-High Resolution Tomography

April 10, 2024
Learn the critical items that designers and engineers must consider when attempting to achieve reliable ultra-high resolution tomography results here!

Voice your opinion!

To join the conversation, and become an exclusive member of Laser Focus World, create an account today!