Nextreme raises $8 million in corporate funding

July 8, 2009
Nextreme Thermal Solutions (Durham, NC), known to many in the photonics industry as a maker of thermoelectric coolers, embedded thermoelectric coolers (which can, for example, be integrated into laser-diode packages), and thin-film thermoelectric coolers, today announced that it has raised $8 million in additional Series B financing from undisclosed corporate investors.

Nextreme Thermal Solutions (Durham, NC), known to many in the photonics industry as a maker of thermoelectric coolers, embedded thermoelectric coolers (which can, for example, be integrated into laser-diode packages), and thin-film thermoelectric coolers, today announced that it has raised $8 million in additional Series B financing from undisclosed corporate investors. Nextreme has now raised more than $21 million in Series B financing and $35 million since its inception in 2004.

In addition to cooling and heating, Nextreme's thermoelectric technology can be used to generate electric power from heat sources. One particular form of this, called "energy harvesting," exploits heat that would otherwise be wastedfor example, in automobile exhauststo provide supplementary power, or to power remote devices. As technology becomes more "green," this could be a very lucrative market, and Nextreme is understandably interested in it.

In addition to LED, laser-diode, and photodetector cooling, Nextreme produces devices for use in electronics applications such as CPU/GPU hot spot cooling, power MOSFET cooling, and thermal control in consumer products.

Nextreme's technology is driven by form factor, device performance and costall of which are expected to drive adoption of this technology and fuel the company's growth, according to the company. "This funding from corporate investors represents a very significant validation of our company and technology, especially during these challenging times," said Jesko von Windheim, CEO of Nextreme. "With our Series B financing now fully in place, the company is well positioned to execute its product-development and sales plan over the next two years."

About the Author

John Wallace | Senior Technical Editor (1998-2022)

John Wallace was with Laser Focus World for nearly 25 years, retiring in late June 2022. He obtained a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering and physics at Rutgers University and a master's in optical engineering at the University of Rochester. Before becoming an editor, John worked as an engineer at RCA, Exxon, Eastman Kodak, and GCA Corporation.

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