Unmanned vehicle vision systems from QinetiQ going to tsunami-ravaged Japan

April 4, 2011
Reston, VA--The government of Japan has accepted an offer from QinetiQ North America for unmanned vehicle vision equipment and associated training to aid in disaster recovery efforts.

Reston, VA--The government of Japan has accepted an offer from QinetiQ North America for unmanned vehicle vision equipment and associated training to aid in disaster recovery efforts for earthquake- and tsunami-ravaged Japan. QinetiQ North America’s technology and services will allow Japan’s response teams to accomplish critical and complex recovery tasks at a safer distance from hazardous debris and other dangerous conditions.

The equipment being staged in Japan for rapid, on-call deployment includes QinetiQ North America’s Robotic Appliqué Kits, which turn Bobcat loaders into unmanned vehicles in just 15 minutes. The kits permit remote operation of all 70 Bobcat vehicle attachments, such as shovels, buckets, grapples, tree cutters and tools to break through walls and doors. The unmanned Bobcat loaders include seven cameras, night vision, thermal imagers, microphones, two-way radio systems and radiation sensors, and can be operated from more than a mile away to safely remove rubble and debris, dig up buried objects and carry smaller equipment.

QinetiQ North America is also staging TALON and Dragon Runner robots in Japan in the event they are needed. TALON robots have previously withstood rigorous deployment and twice daily decontamination at Ground Zero. The TALON robots are equipped with CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive) detection kits that can identify more than 7,500 environmental hazards including toxic industrial chemicals, volatile gases, radiation and explosive risks, as well as temperature and air quality indicators. The TALON robots provide night vision and sound and sensing capabilities from up to 1,000 meters away.

QinetiQ North America’s lightweight Dragon Runner robots, designed for use in small spaces, will be available for investigating rubble piles, trenches, culverts and tunnels. Thermal cameras and sound sensors on the Dragon Runners can provide data from up to 800 m away, permitting the robot’s “eyes and ears” to serve in spaces too small or dangerous for human access.

SOURCE: QinetiQ North America; www.qinetiq-na.com/a07ccafe-0488-4f5b-9121-969e8c8d356a/news-and-events-latest-news-detail.htm

Posted by:Gail OvertonSubscribe now to Laser Focus World magazine; It’s free! Follow us on TwitterFollow OptoIQ on your iPhone. Download the free App here

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