Bioimaging for the 21st cenury

Biomedical optical imaging is a key ingredient in the projection by David Benaron, a physician and biomedical researcher at Stanford University School of Medicine (Palo Alto, CA).

Mar 1st, 2004

"By 2010, unimodal, nonspecific, and insensitive radiological images may look as primitive to us as the first Roentgen radiographs."

David A. Benaron

Biomedical optical imaging is a key ingredient in the projection by David Benaron, a physician and biomedical researcher at Stanford University School of Medicine (Palo Alto, CA). "For much of the 20th century, medical imaging aimed for faster and increasingly detailed anatomic snapshots of the human body," Benaron wrote in an article in Cancer and Metastasis Reviews (March 2002).

Compared to the skeletal- and organ-level information provided by traditional radiological imaging methods, optics, sometimes alone and sometimes in combination with traditional methods, promises imaging at the cellular level, using less invasive methods and less destructive radiation. Perhaps by 2010 the telecom craze days that closed the 20th century will be reinterpreted as the vigorous investment period that enabled a new era of 21st century medicine.

Hassaun A. Jones-Bey
Senior Editor

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