Quantum-ferroelectric IR gas detector outperforms competition

Aydin Displays (Birdsboro, PA) has developed a quantum-ferroelectric (QFE) nondispersing infrared (NDIR) detector for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide that outperforms moisture-sensitive industry-standard crystalline ferroelectric materials (pyroelectrics) such as triglycine sulfide (TGS).

Sep 1st, 2006

Aydin Displays (Birdsboro, PA) has developed a quantum-ferroelectric (QFE) nondispersing infrared (NDIR) detector for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide that outperforms moisture-sensitive industry-standard crystalline ferroelectric materials (pyroelectrics) such as triglycine sulfide (TGS). The QFE NDIR sensor boasts a lifetime of 10,000 hours compared to a typical 2000-hour lifetime for TGS products.

The QFE material is a polar dielectric substance in which an increase in temperature due to absorbed thermal ­energy causes a change in the material’s electrical polarization. Irradiation of the QFE NDIR sensor-which is treated with wavelength-specific metallic evaporated and/or sputtered coatings-disturbs the polarization accompanied by an ejection of electrons from the output surface yielding an initial photoelectric current response followed by a distinct ­pyroelectric current response. This response is targeted to the particular electromagnetic irradiation frequency or band of frequencies specific to the desired functionality of the detector. Compared to TGS, the QFE NDIR material is insensitive to moisture and offers minimal outgassing and high chemical resistance to reactive agents. The QFE sensor is also more stable with increased responsivity. Contact Dave Flanders at dflanders@AydinDisplays.com.

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