AFM-based method of imaging nano-scale bubbles and channels aims to help advance solar cell efficiency

August 10, 2009--A research team led by the University of Washington (Seattle, WA) is using an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure directly how much current each nano-scale bubble and channel within a plastic solar cell carries. The resulting understanding of how a solar cell converts light into electricity promises to facilitate knowledge of which materials created under which conditions enable the greatest efficiency.

August 10, 2009--A research team led by the University of Washington (Seattle, WA) has found a way to produce nano-scale images of tiny bubbles and channels inside plastic solar cells. Their work promises to boost light-to-electricity conversion efficiency of organic solar cells. The researchers use an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure directly how much current each bubble and channel carries, thus developing an understanding of exactly how a solar cell converts light into electricity. UW associate professor of chemistry David Ginger, who spearheaded the work, believes that will lead to a better understanding of which materials created under which conditions are most likely to meet the 10 percent efficiency goal.

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