Bell Atlantic withdraws video dial-tone application from FCC

In April, Bell Atlantic (Arlington, VA) asked the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to suspend processing of two video dial-tone applications. Filed in June 1994, the documents called out hybrid fiber/coaxial technology, believed to be the best choice at the time. Switched-digital video (SDV), the alternative, had significantly higher projected cost and longer time to commercial availability. Media representative Joan Rasmussen says, "In the intervening time, prices have declined, and the

In April, Bell Atlantic (Arlington, VA) asked the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to suspend processing of two video dial-tone applications. Filed in June 1994, the documents called out hybrid fiber/coaxial technology, believed to be the best choice at the time. Switched-digital video (SDV), the alternative, had significantly higher projected cost and longer time to commercial availability. Media representative Joan Rasmussen says, "In the intervening time, prices have declined, and the time difference between when the two technologies would be available has shrunk. SDV offers considerable advantages. We couldn`t stand behind the technology in the current applications, so we asked the FCC to suspend consideration so that we could do the analysis to make the best decision." The company is still committed to building a broadband network. Says Rasmussen, "We`re not changing where we`re going, just how we`re getting there."

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