Erbium-doped Ce:YAG phosphor begets bright 1540 nm emission

An efficient energy transfer from cerium ions (Ce3+) to erbium ions (Er3+) in a yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) matrix has enabled a new class of material that could be an efficient near-infrared emitter, say scientists at Hong Kong Baptist University (Hong Kong) and Jinan University (Guangzhou, China).

Nov 1st, 2007

An efficient energy transfer from cerium ions (Ce3+) to erbium ions (Er3+) in a yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) matrix has enabled a new class of material that could be an efficient near-infrared emitter, say scientists at Hong Kong Baptist University (Hong Kong) and Jinan University (Guangzhou, China). The transfer from Ce3+ toEr3+ in erbium-doped Ce:YAG emission generates a 1000-fold increase in Er3+ emission at 1540 nm. Previous studies of Er3+ have shown that emission at 1540 nm is usually weak partly due to the 4f forbidden transition. Fluorescence of Ce3+, with an allowed d-f transition, is more efficient, transferring to the erbium ions via the matched energy level 4F9/2.

The researchers used a 476 nm argon laser to achieve photoluminescence of the Ce,Er:YAG phosphor, and a xenon-lamp monochromator setup to measure the excitation. Typical dispersed light power at 470 nm was 20 to 70 µW. The 1540 nm emission could be easily achieved via illumination from a simple gallium nitride light-emitting diode, which means it could hold great promise for use in fiber-optic communications. Contact Jian Xin Meng at tmjx@jnu.edu.cn.

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