Microvision to unveil PicoP-based products at SID 2008

May 16, 2008--Microvision (Redmond, WA), provider of ultra-miniature projection display and image capture products for mobility applications, will showcase multiple PicoP-enabled pre-commercial prototypes and engineering demonstrators representing recent developments it has made in collaboration with its manufacturing and supply-chain partners at the Society for Information Display (SID) annual conference in Los Angeles, CA May 19-23.

May 16, 2008--Microvision (Redmond, WA), provider of ultra-miniature projection display and image capture products for mobility applications, will showcase multiple PicoP-enabled pre-commercial prototypes and engineering demonstrators representing recent developments it has made in collaboration with its manufacturing and supply-chain partners at the Society for Information Display (SID) annual conference in Los Angeles, CA May 19-23.

At the SID 2008 exhibition, Microvision plans to publicly demonstrate a palm-sized, self-contained, battery-operated, full-color pico projector, called SHOW. The SHOW device is a prototype of a stand-alone pico projector intended for simple plug-and-play integration with mobile devices, such as cell phones, MP3 players, laptops and gaming devices.

Microvision also plans to introduce its SD3000, an advancement in its see-through, full-color wearable display technology platform. Compared to existing wearable display technologies, which partially occlude the user's surrounding environment or have low brightness levels, the SD3000 demonstrates bright, unobstructed see-through capability, allowing content to be clearly readable in full daylight.

Additionally, Microvision plans to demonstrate its first full-color vehicle head-up display (HUD) based on the PicoP technology. A result of recent developments with one of Microvision's global Tier 1 automotive partners, the HUD demonstrator shows automotive designers a full-color, configurable head-up display with high-contrast and brightness levels that are fully readable--even in bright daylight.

Microvision's PicoP display engine is based on a modular, flexible architecture, comprised of directly modulated light sources, custom-drive electronics and software, optical combiners and Microvision's MEMS single scanning mirror (see www.laserfocusworld.com/articles/314431). The tiny scanning mirror itself is less than one square millimeter in area, or about the size of the head of a pin. The single scanning mirror is designed to scan in both horizontal and vertical directions so that a single beam of light can be precisely steered, in a raster-like fashion, at very high speeds to project a complete video image.

For more information, please visit www.microvision.com.

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